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Highlights from the Crohn’s and Colitis Congress 2019

The “Nutritional Therapy for IBD” exhibit concluded another successful mission at the Crohn’s and Colitis Congress 2019 in Las Vegas. The unique exhibit was created by Kim Beall, Pharm.D., Sheri Pilley, CHC, Gisele Woodward MSW, and David Suskind, MD and is sponsored by the Woodward Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, with the goal to promote awareness for the role of nutrition in management of IBD. It was first introduced at the NASPGHAN 2018 conference (North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition), and was extremely well received, with hundreds of clinicians stopping by to learn about dietary therapy and pick up resources like flash drives loaded with data on nutrition in IBD, patient handouts on diet, and copies of the Nutrition in Immune Balance book, while sampling SCD food.

Kim Beall, a Doctor of Pharmacy, who is also an experienced user of SCD, shares selected conference highlights below related to diet and microbiome. 

...continue reading "Nutrition and Microbiome in IBD"

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Many popular diets instruct people to avoid dairy, for a variety of reasons. When you consider the pros and cons of personal dairy consumption, you may want to add one more variable to the decision equation: should you avoid A1 milk and try A2 milk instead?

A2 milk refers to the protein A2 beta casein, which has been scientifically identified as containing the original form of beta casein produced by cows thousands of years ago. Some people who experienced intolerance for regular dairy find that they can tolerate A2 dairy well. These days, A2 milk is available in many supermarkets in the USA and in Europe, so experimenting with this option is easy.
...continue reading "A2 milk and the dairy debate"

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The European Crohns and Colitis Organization (ECCO) is the largest forum of medical IBD specialists in the world. The 2018 ECCO Congress drew 6,676 delegates from 86 different countries. Over one thousand abstracts were accepted and presented this year, covering overwhelming amounts of data and analysis. The wide range of topics included novel treatment strategies, IBD diagnosis, disease predictions, management of IBD, evolving concepts in IBD, and Pediatric IBD.

I encourage you to check the detailed agenda of the event. The long lists of studies and presentations demonstrate the magnitude of the IBD challenge, and the enormous investments of money and talent that are being invested in finding better treatment options. This raises hopes for better understanding and ultimately resolution and cure of IBD. 

...continue reading "Deeper understandings and improved treatments for IBD"

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John Zoshak is a graduate student in the Human Centered Design and Engineering Program at the University of Washington. He is working with Dr. David Suskind of Seattle Children’s Hospital on an independent analytical study that will look at dietary therapy for IBD from a user perspective. This is a quality improvement field study, with the goal of easing the burden of adherence to dietary therapy.

...continue reading "A new study will examine IBD diet from a user perspective"

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A growing number of posts within the online SCD communities show a photo of a manufactured food product and ask the group "Is this legal?" Unfortunately, there can never be a perfect answer to this question. 

 

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A simple, delicious, colorful path to wellness

A strong body of research supports the idea that a vegetable centered diet is key to wellness. Meals based on plant foods are rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals. Add reasonable amounts of good protein sources, like pastured eggs, sea food, some organic meats, top with healthy unprocessed fats, and you have achieved the optimal diet according to the latest leaders in nutritional research .

 
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Many of us, who are practicing diets free of refined sugars, use honey as a sweetener of choice. Natural, full of micronutrients, antibacterial, what’s not to like? Why limit the good stuff?

 

For the most part, our body recognizes honey as a simple sugar, and science has already established the fact that sugar promotes inflammation. In fact, many dieters who only saw limited results from eating classic SCD, found that avoiding honey resulted in better progress towards healing.

...continue reading "Honey and SCD – sweetness with a sting"

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Controlled breathing can be one of the most potent tools for managing symptoms, creating and sustaining wellness. Breathing techniques provide an easy, drug free option to reduce symptoms of gut disorders and improve digestion.

Controlled breathing, often called breathwork, is also very effective for pain management and helps with many other maladies, like stress, anxiety, insomnia, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, attention deficit disorder and high blood pressure, to name a few.

...continue reading "Breathing techniques for gut health"

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A newly published research article raises growing concerns about the safety of dairy products.

The research was conducted by Michael Collins, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, in cooperation with Irene Grant from the Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, United Kingdom, shows a high survival rate of MAP bacteria in powdered milk products.
The study authors concluded: "the broader food safety implications of detecting viable MAP in this type of dried dairy product are not insignificant given that powdered infant formulae is consumed by young babies with immature immune systems."

...continue reading "SCD yogurt safety concerns – considering new MAP research"

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Follow-up to this post.

To People with Crohn’s Disease

I receive many letters from people around the world asking about treating Crohn’s disease with antibiotics, under the theory that Crohn’s disease is an infection caused by MAP, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. I am a psychiatrist, not a gastroenterologist (GI), and not qualified to make specific suggestions about treating Crohn’s disease. I never treat any GI patients myself, and never did. I will never tell people specific doses or protocols for treating MAP because every patient is different. If you elect to learn more and follow this path, you will need your own local physician. I am only offering general information ...continue reading "Judith Eve Lipton, MD: Summary of my personal experiences with MAP and my recommendations."

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